Categories
New Student Guide 2022

Letter From the Editor

Dear Readers,

From myself and everyone here at The Hoya — Georgetown University’s student-run newspaper of record since 1920 — welcome to your first year on the Hilltop! 

Moving to a new place is a stressful experience for every new student. The Hoya’s New Student Guide is designed to ease the transition for new students by helping you navigate both Georgetown and the greater city of Washington, D.C. You can find almost anything in our guide: an overview of Georgetown sports, the best place to grab a bite on campus, a list of Georgetown’s resource centers, a recap of all the top news stories you missed from last semester, and some advice on the best jogging routes around campus. No matter your interests, we’ve got you covered.

As you explore campus and learn more about our community, remember: Georgetown is not a flawless place, and it is far from perfect with regard to equitably supporting all students in our community. One of the most important things you can do during your first year at Georgetown is to educate yourself on the student activism efforts across our campus. Look through social media and in the pages of media publications across campus to stay informed. While I hope you read The Hoya, I also highly recommend our fellow media organizations. Stay engaged with the work of students who seek to make the Hilltop a more inclusive place for all, and who knows,

maybe the work of these activists will become your work too. 

Finally, some advice from a somewhat experienced senior: go to class as much as possible, and when it’s not possible, go to office hours. Leave room in your schedule to relax and unwind, and always try to get eight hours of sleep. Surround yourself with people who support you. Don’t forget to call the people you love, whether that be friends, family members, or even old teachers. Fill your time with the things that bring you joy. Last, but certainly not least: make your Flex Dollars last (though, if you’re anything like me, you’ll run out by mid-October — please learn from my mistakes).

Go forth and be the change, newest Hoyas, and best of luck with your first semester on the Hilltop! 

Hoya Saxa,

Katie Hawkinson (COL ’23)

Editor in Chief 

P.S. — like what you see and want to help us make our next New Student Guide, as well as produce our daily online and weekly print newspaper? Check out our website to learn how to join The Hoya.

Categories
New Student Guide 2022

Getting Around D.C.

By Sydney Raymond

Washington, D.C. is a big city with many monuments to see, museums to explore, and restaurants to try. To experience everything that the District has to offer, you need to know how to get from place to place. From the Metro to e-scooters, there are transportation options in D.C. and on campus that can help you find your way around.

On Campus

You can find great transportation options without even walking off campus! Whether you’re rushing to class or heading to downtown Washington, D.C., for the day, you can scoot, bike or drive right to your destination.

Electric scooters are a great option for shortening the trek from Darnall Hall to Car Barn or grabbing a quick lunch in the Georgetown neighborhood. Lime and Bird scooters, which charge a per-minute fee, can be found scattered all across campus — usually near Lauinger Library and dorm buildings — and their affiliated apps make them simple and convenient transportation options. When you’re done, just flip down the kickstand and carry on!

Zipcars, located in front of Harbin Hall or in the Lauinger library parking lot, are a great option for traveling on your own schedule or with a group of friends. They can be rented hourly or daily through the Zipcar app, which offers discounted student rates. All you need is a driver’s license! You have to return Zipcars to the Zipcar parking lot at the end of your trip, so they’re best for round-trip adventures into D.C. or the surrounding states.

The Georgetown University Transportation Shuttle, or GUTS bus (because Georgetown loves an acronym), is another great option for student transportation. Unlike electric scooters and Zipcars, the GUTS bus is completely free for Georgetown students and staff. GUTS buses run from 5 a.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday, with six different routes. The GUTS bus is perfect for almost all your travel needs in the District, from weekday voyages to your favorite cafe in Dupont Circle to attending protests at the Capitol. The Dupont Circle and Rosslyn routes are also convenient ways to reach the Dupont and Rosslyn Metro stations.

Off Campus

If you want to get off campus during the weekend when the GUTS bus isn’t running or go to a fun event in Maryland with friends, there are also plenty of off-campus transportation options for students to take advantage of. The Metro, operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), runs on six lines and is an ideal way to explore the District. You can plan your Metro trip with the DC Metro and Bus app or Citymapper (both apps also include Metrobus and Circulator routes) and pay Metro fares with the SmarTrip app. The closest Metro stations to campus are Foggy Bottom-GWU, Rosslyn and Dupont Circle. Each is within a half-hour walk from campus, or you could take the Metrobus or Circulator to speed up your trip!

The Metrobus and DC Circulator, both also operated by WMATA, have a few stops closer to campus, including one on the Metrobus’s G2 route located right outside the front gates! There are also stops at Q St. NW and 35th St. NW (Metrobus’s D2 and D6 routes) and 35th St. and Wisconsin Ave. NW (Circulator’s Georgetown-Union Station route). Even better, Circulator fares are only a dollar! The Metrobus and Circulator use the same SmarTrip card as the Metro, which you can purchase at any Metro station. It’s a great idea to take the GUTS bus to Dupont Circle at the start of the semester to get your first SmarTrip card!

Electric scooters are also available off campus, or you could spring for a Capital Bikeshare bike! Capital Bikeshare operates like most urban bike sharing services, and it consists of many bike stations across D.C., including one in front of campus. They’re great for pedaling around the monuments or cruising along the Georgetown Waterfront and offer discounted annual memberships for Georgetown students. They don’t need to be returned to the same station you picked them up at, so you can always leave your bike at a station downtown and take the bus home on a rainy day.

For a more tourist-y but fun travel experience, consider trying out a water taxi! The Georgetown dock is located along the waterfront near Washington Harbour. Get off at The Wharf to see concerts at The Anthem and Union Stage or travel farther down the Potomac River to Old Town Alexandria, Va., and National Harbor, Md. 

Categories
New Student Guide 2022

Resources to Bookmark

Updated by Katie Hawkinson

The following is a comprehensive, though not exhaustive, list of safety, health and academic resources at Georgetown University that may be helpful to you during your time on the Hilltop.  I would encourage every single person on the Hilltop — first-year or not — to save this list and take advantage of the many resources we have on and off campus. Each resource listed contains a general overview of the services provided, as well as physical locations (if applicable) and contact information.

Overview

Resources for Undergraduate Students lists resources for reporting sexual misconduct, including confidential counselors and semiconfidential and nonconfidential resources.

Academic and Campus Life Resources

Academic Resource Center: 202-687-8354

  • Mission: “The ARC provides academic assistance, disability accommodations, and student-athlete support.”
  • Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday
  • Location: Leavey Center 338
  • Contact: If you have questions about disability accommodations or student-athlete support, contact your assigned administrator via email. If you are a new student with questions about ARC services, email is recommended as the most efficient line of communication: [email protected]

Facilities Management: 202-687-3432

  • Mission: Facilities take care of campus infrastructure. You will most often be in touch with them if you have problems with your dorm room. 
  • Submit online requests any time through the work requestor. 
  • Hours: Monday through Saturday: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sunday: 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
  • Location: Harbin Hall B-24 (entrance at field level)
  • Contact:
    • Emergency Facilities Service Requests: 202-687-3432
    • After-hours emergencies: Call the Georgetown University Police Department at 202-687-4343.

Office of Student Financial Services: (202) 687-4547

  • The Office of Student Financial Services coordinates financial aid for undergraduate students. Visit their website to find your financial aid advisor, as well as their contact information.
  • Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday
  • Location: Reiss Science Building, Suite 200 
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • Virtual services offered.

Student Employment Center: 202-687-4187

  • Mission: The Student Employment Center allows undergraduate and graduate students — both those with Federal Work Study Awards and those without — to search for jobs on- and off-campus. 
  • Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday
  • Location: Suite 200, Reiss Science Building
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • Virtual services offered.

Community Resources

Center for Multicultural Equity & Access (CMEA): 202-687-4054

  • Mission: “CMEA enhances the education of students historically denied access to Georgetown because of race, ethnicity, national origin, socioeconomic status and other marginalized identities by providing a variety of intentional and culturally relevant programming, services and opportunities to foster student success inside and outside of the classroom.”
  • Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday 
  • Location: Fifth Floor Leavey Center
  • Contact: [email protected]

Community Scholars Program (CSP)

  • Mission: “Managed by the Center for Multicultural Equity & Access, CSP provides enhanced educational opportunities for a multicultural cohort of first-generation college students. The program supports its students throughout their Georgetown careers with academic advising, mentoring and personal counseling, study groups, workshops and seminars.”
  • Location: Fifth Floor Leavey Center
  • Contact: [email protected]

Georgetown Scholars Program: 202-687-7351

Hoya Hub

  • Mission: “The Hoya Hub food pantry is a resource for any member of the Georgetown University community experiencing food insecurity. It is a pantry stocked with non-perishable food items, available to anyone who needs food on an immediate, emergency basis. No Hoya should go hungry; the Hoya Hub is a place to pick up nutritious food to cover short breaks or other unplanned gaps in access to meals.”
  • Any undergraduate or graduate student, staff or faculty member can access the Hoya Hub. The Hoya Hub access code form can be found here.
  • Location: Leavey Center 418
  • Contact: [email protected] (non-confidential); [email protected] (will connect you to a confidential resource).

H*yas for Choice

  • Mission: “H*yas for Choice (HFC) is the pro-choice, sex-positive, reproductive justice organization at Georgetown University. We are an anti-racist, queer-affirming organization working to provide direct sexual and reproductive health services and improve access to resources for people of all genders on Georgetown’s campus.”
  • H*yas for Choice serves as one of the only providers of contraceptives on campus, and has previously provided students with a variety of other resources, such as menstrual products and free Narcan training.
  • Contact: [email protected]

LGBTQ Resource Center: 202-687-3546

  • Mission: “The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning (LGBTQ) Resource Center provides education, programming, support services, and voice to Georgetown students, faculty, staff, and alumni of all sexual orientations and gender identities. We are committed to understanding sexual orientation and gender identity in the context of and as it intersects with race, religion, ethnicity, nationality, ability, socio-economic status, and culture.”
  • Location: Leavey Center 325
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • The LGBTQ Resource Center is a semiconfidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. 

Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity & Affirmative Action (IDEAA): 202-687-4798

  • Mission: “The mission of the Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity & Affirmative Action is to promote a deep understanding and appreciation among the diverse members of the University community to result in justice and equality in educational, employment and contracting opportunities, as well as to lead efforts to create an inclusive academic and work environment.” 
  • Houses programs like Title IX. 
  • You can file a bias complaint on IDEAA’s website.

Residential Ministry: 202-687-4300

  • Mission: “Together with the full-time Campus Ministry staff, Residential Ministers embody Georgetown’s commitment to cura personalis by caring deeply for the spiritual, emotional, and social needs of all students.”
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • Location: Residential ministers live in each dorm.
  • Campus Ministry staff are a semiconfidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. Ordained clergy acting in their pastoral roles are a confidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. 

Women’s Center: 202-687-6359

  • Mission: “The Women’s Center supports and empowers students at Georgetown. Women are the majority of the student body, yet are often marginalized in the classroom and campus experiences. As a result, the Women’s Center seeks to center the experience of women and educate the entire campus about gender dynamics that impact campus culture. We seek to create a more equitable campus for a more expansive notion of gender and gender roles. We serve students of all gender identities.”
  • Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday
  • Location: Leavey Center 327
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • Virtual services offered; see the Virtual Women’s Center for more details
  • The Women’s Center is a semiconfidential resource for survivors of sexual assault.

Health and Safety Resources

Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS): 202-687-6985

  • Mission: “Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) serves as the university’s primary mental health agency for its students and campus community. Our central mission is to collaborate directly with students to help them find ways in which to overcome difficulties that may interfere with the definition and accomplishment of their educational, personal, and career goals.”
  • Location: Darnall Hall, accessible through an exterior entrance on the second floor, upstairs from Epicurean. 
  • Contact: 
    • After-hours urgent medical concerns: 202-687-6985. Ask for the CAPS clinician on call.
  • CAPS can provide confidential counselling for survivors of sexual assault. 

D.C. Rape Crisis Center hotline: 202-333-7273

  • Mission: “DCRCC is the oldest and the first rape crisis center in the country, and the only rape crisis center in the District of Columbia that has spent the past 46 years listening to the stories of survivors of sexual assault. In our 46th year, we are working to empower a culture of consent.”
  • Hours: 24/7
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • The DCRCC hotline is anonymous, and calls are confidential. 

Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service

  • Emergency line:  202-687-4357
  • Mission: “The Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service (also known as GERMS or Georgetown EMS) is an all-volunteer, student-run emergency ambulance service. GERMS operates basic life support ambulances that serve Georgetown University and the broader Georgetown community.”
  • Beginning Aug. 18 2022, GERMS will resume 24/7 service.
  • Contact: 

Georgetown University Police Department: 202-687-4343

  • Mission: “Georgetown University Police is committed to helping maintain a safe and secure environment on Georgetown University’s main campus.”
  • Hours: 24/7
  • Location: Village C, West Wing, entrance at ground level across from Kehoe Field.
  • Contact: [email protected]

Health Education Services: 202-687-8949

  • Mission: “HES seeks to empower students to take responsibility for decisions regarding their health as well as actively tries to increase community identification of students at risk. HES offers consultation, networking, and advocacy for primary prevention, risk reduction, and health promotion. We also provide confidential crisis response, referrals, and advocacy for concerns related to Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence & Stalking, Alcohol & Other Drugs, Sexual Health & Pregnancy, Eating Disturbances & Body Image, and Nutrition.”
  • All HES services are free of charge.
  • HOURS: To be determined
  • Location: 1437 37th St. NW, Poulton Hall, Suite 101
  • Contact: Email the appropriate staff member to make an appointment.
  • HES is a confidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. 

SafeRides: 202-784-7433

  • Mission: SafeRides provides safe transportation to and from campus and adjacent neighborhoods within defined boundaries for Georgetown students, faculty and staff who need transportation at night.
  • Hours: SafeRides service begins every evening at 8 p.m. The service is available until 2 a.m. Sunday through Wednesday and until 3 a.m. Thursday through Saturday.

Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence & Stalking Services (SARP)

  • Mission: “The Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Team has several clinicians whose area of expertise is working with and assisting survivors of interpersonal violence, including sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking. Services include resources for education, support, medical care and legal action.”
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • The SARP team of counselors are a confidential resource for survivors of sexual assault.
  • Jen Luettel Schweer is the associate director of Health Education Services and a confidential clinician with the Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Team who can provide confidential assistance to survivors. She can be reached at 202-687-0323 and [email protected]

Student Health Center: 202-687-2200 

  • Mission: “The Student Health Center (SHC) is staffed by primary care physicians and nurse practitioners with particular interest and experience in college health. We are dedicated to providing high quality health care to the students of Georgetown University.”
  • Fall Hours: To be determined
  • Location: 3800 Reservoir Road, NW, Ground Floor, Darnall Hall
  • Contact: 
    • After-hours emergencies: 202-444-7243 — indicate that you are a student and ask for the Student Health Center physician on call.
Categories
New Student Guide 2022

Advice from The Hoya’s Board of Editors

The Hoya’s Board of Editors is made up of second-, third- and fourth-year students excited to pass along their wisdom and advice to all you incoming first-year students. From advice on navigating your courses to our favorite things to do in Washington, D.C., we hope these nuggets of wisdom help you along during your first year on the Hilltop!

Good luck,

Board of Editors (Fall 2022)

Managing College Academics

“Go to office hours (and not just the week before finals)! It pays off to create a relationship with your professors and TAs at the start of the semester.”

Laetitia Haddad (SFS ’24) 

“For me, switching up study spots is one of the best ways to ensure I stay focused and sane. Try out different spots (even if that just means a new floor on Lau or a new table in Leavey!).”

Naomi Greenberg (COL ’24) 

“Make sure you keep up with your readings in class! Allowing yourself to fall behind too much in your textbook is a surefire way to ensure you won’t catch up in time for exams. I always feel like I am able to better understand a professor’s lecture if I already have some background from reading, and it allows me to think I know more than my classmates (even when I actually don’t!)”

Eli Kales (COL ’24) 

Our Favorite Professors

“Try to take a class with Professor Elizabeth Grimm! She’s an incredible lecturer, the readings she assigns are always interesting, and she really cares about her students.” 

Adora Zheng (SFS ’25)

“I absolutely loved Professor Min-Ah Cho’s Problem of God class! The sweetest person to talk to and very interesting discussion topics. Also, her cat is adorable.”

Erica Kim (SFS ’24)

“I highly recommend any class taught by Professor Joseph Hartman! He explains complex topics in an extremely understandable way and is always open to offering academic and professional advice in office hours!”

Rushil Vashee (SFS ’25)

“I cannot recommend Professor Alice Sandosharaj enough. Her writing classes are incredibly informative and she cares for her students so much. Definitely take one of her classes!”

John O’Connor (COL ‘23)

“I can’t speak highly enough of any class with Professor Libbie Rifkin! Her thought-provoking discussions, extremely interesting readings and commitment to accessibility make her classes an enriching experience for anyone who takes them.” 

Jared Carmeli (COL ’24)

Navigating Work-life Balance

“Definitely make sure you’re using some sort of planner. Between your classes and clubs and other events, you’ll constantly be bombarded with things to do, and keeping them all in your head eventually becomes impossible. You’ve got a few different options to use, whether a physical planning book, Google Calendar, or even the Reminders app on your phone — whatever works for you.”

Ishaan Rai (SFS ’23)

“Make time for hobbies and other activities that you enjoy doing! Particularly as school inevitably gets stressful with exams, papers, etc., it’s important to build time into your schedule devoted to things that will help you destress.”

Jared Carmeli (COL ’24)

“Look at the bigger picture. The experiences you accumulate help tell the story of who you are, so take some time to reflect every few months about where you want to go and how you can achieve that. This applies to every aspect of your college life, from classes, clubs, and internships to hobbies and friendships.”

Noa Bronicki (COL ’23)

Exploring Washington, D.C. 

“Make the most of The Kennedy Center, a premier venue for the performing arts located only 1.5 miles from campus. Sign up for MyTix and tickets at a student discount to see a variety of shows and performances!”

Laetitia Haddad (SFS ’24) 

“The waterfront is a runner’s best friend! A 30-minute jog by the Potomac lets you see Georgetown, the Kennedy Center, and the heart of D.C. It is especially beautiful during the cherry blossom season.”

Tim Goh (SFS ’25)  

“My favorite spot in D.C. is the National Cathedral — it’s just far enough from campus to feel like you’re escaping the Georgetown bubble while also being within walking distance (although be sure to wear your tennis shoes since you’re walking uphill). Planning a picnic outside the Cathedral is perfect for when the weather’s still nice out and you want to enjoy the sunset with friends.”

Eli Kales (COL ’24) 

“Spend a day at Old Town Alexandria! Super suburban, small-town feel with cute cafes/brunch spots. You can even take the water taxi or city cruise to the Wharf, National Harbor, Georgetown, or Nationals Stadium!”

Erica Kim (SFS ’24)

Categories
New Student Guide 2022

Map of Georgetown Main Campus

By Jimin Lee

Categories
New Student Guide 2022

Navigating the First Week of Classes

By Noa Bronicki

The first day of classes is fast approaching, yet the courses you signed up for may not be the first thing on your mind. Whether you are an upperclassman eagerly looking forward to reuniting with friends or a first-year student moving to the Hilltop for the first time, the initial few days back on campus can be a whirlwind. Now, however, it’s time to turn your attention back to academics. 

Taking things one step at a time, the most important item is to show up to class. This includes not only the classes you are enrolled in, but also any classes for which you are waitlisted. If you are serious about the class, email the professor in advance, show up on the first day and you have a good chance of being added. Familiarize yourself with your schedule, the classroom numbers and remember that the first Wednesday of classes is actually a Wednesday schedule, and not a Monday like last year. If this is your first time on campus, it will be helpful to scope out your classes in advance. Even a senior might get turned around in the maze that we call the Intercultural Center (ICC) or forget that you need to use the side entrances of White Gravenor to reach the second floor classrooms. 

Check your syllabi as soon as you get them, as some courses might have readings due the first day. Renting textbooks through Amazon can be a cheaper alternative to buying from the bookstore, although you need to plan in advance in order to get them processed through Georgetown’s package pickup center on time. If you’re indecisive, you may want to rent from Georegetown’s bookstore; you’ll have the option to return the textbooks for any class you drop during the add/drop period. 

You will quickly find that most Georgetown University students use Google Calendar to stay organized. Even if you prefer a paper planner, you might find yourself receiving Gcal invites for lunch at Georgetown’s main dining hall — informally known as Leo’s — and weekend social gatherings. Whichever method you choose, I recommend setting alarms a few minutes before you actually need to leave for your classes. The scheduled reminders will spare you from both wasting time constantly glancing at the clock and the embarrassment of walking in late to a room full of staring students and slinking off to a seat at the perimeter. That corner seat may be more fatal than you think; even without assigned seating, routines established on the first day tend to stick, and you might find yourself craning your neck at the board to read your professor’s messy handwriting all semester.

To ensure you get a good spot, don’t be afraid to sit front and center. It will make a good first impression, and force you to stay awake and pay attention in class. Additionally, don’t hesitate to sit right next to someone. Not every seat will get filled, so if you surround yourself with empty chairs, you might remain alone. Instead, say hi to the student in the adjacent seat. Even if you don’t become life-long friends, you may at least end up with a study buddy for the semester. 

Speaking of first impressions, it might be a cliche, but they do matter. Set your morning alarm early enough so you have time to get ready, and dress in a way that reflects your intentions. Dressing well may help you to feel more put together, and signal to your professors that you are a good student who is there to learn. Along the same vein, come to class prepared. In addition to the supplies you know you’ll need, bring an extra pen and folder, just in case you end up with one of those few professors that insists on having everything on paper. 

As the week comes to an end, set yourself up for a strong semester. Write down the dates of important assignments and midterms from your syllabus. You’ve heard it before and you’ll hear it again, but go to office hours. You don’t need to plan out a brilliant question to ask. Just introduce yourself to the professor and get to know them. Go to recitation even if it seems repetitive. Developing and maintaining relationships with your professors and teaching assistants (TAs) will go a long way and will help you succeed in the course and beyond. 

If you’ll only take one piece of advice from this article, it’s this: don’t take the first week too seriously. It likely won’t go entirely according to plan, and while any mishap might feel extremely critical and life-altering in the moment, it will all be a blur by midterms. 

Categories
New Student Guide 2022

Spring 2022 on the Hilltop: A Recap

By Adora Zheng and Eli Kales

From the opening of the Earth Commons, the university’s new institute focused on environmental justice, to the celebration of Nam Vu (COL ’22), a student who represented the university in the Jeopardy! National College Championship, spring 2022 was a busy semester for Georgetown community members. The semester kicked off virtually due to a spike in COVID-19 cases, but the news cycle never stopped. 

Scroll through the timeline below to get caught up on what happened on campus before you arrived. Click the headlines to read the full stories!

Categories
New Student Guide 2022

Where to Shop in Georgetown and D.C.

By Laetitia Haddad

Want to stay up to date on all the latest trends? Need a new pair of running shoes? How about some fresh produce, or an antique rug? Maybe you’re just craving some quality retail therapy. Luckily, shopping in the Georgetown neighborhood and the greater Washington, D.C. area can be affordable, efficient and enjoyable — the perfect way to spend an afternoon or weekend! 

Georgetown University is located a couple of blocks from M Street and Wisconsin Avenue, two major thoroughfares known for their blend of affordable brands, higher-end fashion and boutique stores. A wide variety of stores are available a mere 15 minutes from campus. 

For well-priced, trendy clothing, check out H&M (3222 M St. NW), Brandy Melville (3307 M St. NW) or T.J. Maxx (3254 M St. NW). If you’re willing to spend a bit more, Everlane (3259 M St. NW) is known for its jeans and sustainable basics, and Anthropologie (3222 M St. NW) is a great place to buy a gift or some home decor to spruce up your dorm space. Urban Outfitters in Georgetown (3111 M St. NW) is known for its giant sale room at the back of the store. Abercrombie (1208 Wisconsin Ave. NW), Aritzia (3210 M St. NW), Madewell (1237 Wisconsin Ave. NW) and Reformation (3033 M St. NW) are other popular shopping destinations. 

For skin care necessities and makeup splurges, stop by Sephora (3241 M St. NW), Bluemercury (3059 M St. NW) or the new Glossier store (3065 M St. NW), which just opened in late July. If you want to head to Georgetown’s on-campus gym, Yates Field House, but need some workout gear, head to Nike (3040 M St. NW), Lululemon (3265 M St. NW) or Athleta (3229 M St. NW). 

Want to grab a coffee and browse a bookstore? Stop by Compass Coffee (1351 Wisconsin Ave. NW) or Foxtrot (1267 Wisconsin Ave. NW), and then check out The Lantern Bookshop (3241 P St. NW), which is closer to campus, or Bridge Street Books (2814 Pennsylvania Ave. NW), which is a bit further. Either way, you’re bound to find your next favorite book. 

If you have a Sunday morning to spare, check out the Georgetown flea market (1819 35th St. NW). Its vendors sell a variety of treasures, from antiques and vintage jewelry to framed posters and thrifted clothing. Shop Made in D.C. (1304 Wisconsin Ave. NW) presents products from independent, local businesses. The store is a wonderful place to pick up a unique craft, artisan food goods, handmade jewelry or D.C. memorabilia.

Sometimes, Leo’s dining hall food just doesn’t hit the spot. If you’re craving some fresh produce, head to the Rose Park Farmer’s Market (1401 27th St. NW), which operates seasonally on Wednesdays from 3-7 p.m. Similarly, venture over to the Dupont Circle Farmers Market (1600 20th St. NW) on Sunday between 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 

For more shopping variety, there are retail destinations accessible by bus or metro in the greater D.C. area. Tyson’s Corner Center Mall (1961 Chain Bridge Rd.) is an expansive indoor mall in Northern Virginia on the Silver Line. This mall boasts many popular brands like Brooks Brothers, Free People, Cotton On and The North Face as well as Bloomingdale’s and Barnes & Noble. For a smaller mall, check out the Fashion Centre at Pentagon City (1100 S Hayes St.), accessible by the Blue and Yellow Lines. Stores include department stores like Macy’s and Nordstrom as well as popular shops like Aerie, Levi’s, Zara, Steve Madden and J. Crew. 

At Georgetown University, a bustling city with a variety of opportunities to explore — including great shopping — is at your fingertips. From second-hand stores to big brand names, there is a plethora of accessible retail options available to Georgetown students in the neighborhood and greater District. 

Categories
New Student Guide 2021

Here’s what you need to know about Georgetown club life

By: Dalia Liu and Erin Casey

Do you like to grill? Are you a running enthusiast? Do you devote your free time to analyzing financial reports and problem-solving business-related challenges? Whether you’re a gardener or a software engineer, there’s a community on campus dedicated to your biggest passion. 

As we transition back to in-person operations after over a year of virtual learning, clubs and club culture are coming back in full swing. On Aug. 28 and Sept. 12, the Council of Advisory Boards will host CAB Fair: a daylong event in which students can walk through booths on the front lawns to learn about each club. If you’re unsure about which organizations you’d like to visit, reading through the club directory is a helpful first step. Another great way to stay updated on both campuswide and club-focused events is to join Georgetown’s Campus Groups page, where organizations post details about their events. Once you find organizations you’re interested in, sign up for their emails and follow them on social media to stay updated on application dates and requirements. 

Extracurricular organizations at Georgetown are a great way to meet friends, as many students will attest, but they can also seem overwhelming and stressful. Club culture can be hard to navigate as a new student, but we hope this guide addresses your most important questions. Don’t hesitate to reach out to the officers of the clubs you’re interested in for more information!

Are clubs competitive?

Chances are you’ve heard that Georgetown has a competitive and sometimes even exclusive club culture. If you’re interested in pre-professional organizations, you’ll find that some seem almost impossible to join, only accepting a small percentage of applicants. Many students experience rejection from clubs at least once. While getting denied is painful, you can always reapply to the club in the spring semester! This also means many of the club members, including the officers themselves, might not have made it in their first try. In addition, there are many more clubs that do not require applications than there are that do. Organizations on campus that are open for everybody to join provide just as much networking and just as many opportunities as closed ones, and they are just as enriching communities for members. 

What if I don’t join any clubs?

You’ll be completely fine! Clubs are a great way for many students to explore their interests, but they aren’t one size fits all. Outside of joining clubs, there are a multitude of opportunities to explore your interests with both diverse and like-minded peers in the Washington, D.C. area. Getting involved at Georgetown looks different for everyone, and whether you choose to join clubs or pursue programs outside of Georgetown, you can easily find a community to develop your passions. 

Do I have to apply to every club?

No, every club has its own application process and timeline. To find each organization’s application information, search for the club on Campus Groups and look through their social media pages. 

How time consuming is getting involved with extracurriculars?

Your extracurricular experience is what you make of it. If you’re willing to devote a lot of time, you can get involved in more administrative roles that allow you to get more involved within the club. If you’re just looking for something to supplement your experience at Georgetown outside of your classwork, you can find roles with a lower time commitment that will still allow you to explore new activities and make connections with peers.

Are clubs a big part of campus life?

Clubs and organizations host a lot of social events on campus. They can certainly feel like a large part of your social life, but you definitely don’t have to depend on them to have a good social experience. Meeting people through clubs is just one of many, many ways to make friends. You’ll make friends through your dorm, classes, discussions, etc. Your circle of friends will most likely evolve throughout your college experience, and whether you meet them through clubs or your classes, you will find a lot of interesting people to interact with. 

What are unaffiliated organizations?

Unaffiliated organizations are groups on campus that aren’t officially recognized by the university but whose members are part of the Georgetown community. These include both social and professional sororities and fraternities as well as interest-based groups like H*yas for Choice, the pro-abortion reproductive justice group advocating for improved access to sexual health resources. Unrecognized organizations don’t receive funding from the Student Activities Commision, but they still have a notable presence on campus. Joining unaffiliated organizations is not a comparative disadvantage to joining officially recognized organizations; finding the group that best fits your interests and values is the most important consideration when it comes to joining clubs. 

Categories
New Student Guide 2021

Resources To Bookmark

Updated by Riley Rogerson

After more than a year of virtual operations, resources for Georgetown University students are back up and running. While many are still navigating COVID-19 protocols and will offer both online and in-person services, they are all just a phone call away. Here are some resources you might want to bookmark. Check websites for the most updated information.

Academic Resource Center: 202-687-8354

  • Mission: The ARC provides resources for academic, student-athlete and disability support.
  • Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday 
  • Location: Leavey Center 338
  • Contact: If you have questions about disability accommodations or student-athlete support, contact your assigned administrator via email. If you are a new student with questions about ARC services, email is recommended as the most efficient line of communication: [email protected]

Center for Multicultural Equity & Access (CMEA): 202-687-4054

  • Mission: CMEA enhances the education of students historically denied access to Georgetown because of race, ethnicity, national origin, socioeconomic status and other marginalized identities by providing a variety of intentional and culturally relevant programming, services and opportunities to foster student success inside and outside of the classroom. Resources include the Elizabeth Ash Velez Book Co-Op Library, book loan scholarships, counseling services, career counseling, low-cost printing, copying and faxing, programming advising and summer housing scholarships.
  • Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday 
  • Location: Fifth Floor Leavey Center
  • Contact: [email protected]

Community Scholars Program (CSP)

  • Mission: “Managed by the Center for Multicultural Equity & Access, CSP provides enhanced educational opportunities for a multicultural cohort of first-generation college students. The program supports its students throughout their Georgetown careers with academic advising, mentoring and personal counseling, study groups, workshops and seminars.”
  • Location: Fifth Floor Leavey Center
  • Contact: [email protected]

Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS): 202-687-6985

  • Mission: “Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) serves as the university’s primary mental health agency for its students and campus community. Our central mission is to collaborate directly with students to help them find ways in which to overcome difficulties that may interfere with the definition and accomplishment of their educational, personal, and career goals.”
  • Location: On the ground level and back side of Darnall Hall. 
  • Contact: 
    • After-hours urgent medical concerns: 202-687-6985. Ask for the CAPS clinician on call.
  • CAPS is a confidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. 

D.C. Rape Crisis Center hotline: 202-333-7273

  • Mission: “DCRCC is the oldest and the first rape crisis center in the country, and the only rape crisis center in the District of Columbia that has spent the past 46 years listening to the stories of survivors of sexual assault. In our 46th year, we are working to empower a culture of consent.”
  • Hours: 24/7
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • The DCRCC hotline is anonymous, and calls are confidential. 

Facilities Management: 202-687-3432

  • Mission: Facilities take care of campus infrastructure. You will most often be in touch with them if you have problems with your dorm room. 
  • Submit online requests any time through the work requestor. 
  • Hours: Monday through Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday: 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
  • Location: Harbin Hall B-24 (entrance at field level)
  • Contact:
    • Emergency Facilities Service Requests: 202-687-3432
    • After-hours emergencies: Call the Georgetown University Police Department at 202-687-4343.

Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service: 202-687-4357

  • Mission: “The Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service (also known as GERMS or Georgetown EMS) is an all-volunteer, student-run emergency ambulance service. GERMS operates basic life support ambulances that serve Georgetown University and the broader Georgetown community.”
  • Hours: Fridays 8 p.m. to Saturdays 8 a.m. and Saturdays 8 p.m. to Sundays 8 a.m. starting Aug. 21
  • Contact: 

Georgetown Scholars Program: 202-687-7351

Georgetown University Police Department: 202-687-4343

  • Mission: “Georgetown University Police is committed to helping maintain a safe and secure environment on Georgetown University’s main campus.”
  • Hours: 24/7
  • Location: Village C, West Wing
  • Contact: [email protected]

Health Education Services: 202-687-8949

  • Mission: “HES seeks to empower students to take responsibility for decisions regarding their health as well as actively tries to increase community identification of students at risk. HES offers consultation, networking, and advocacy for primary prevention, risk reduction, and health promotion. We also provide confidential crisis response, referrals, and advocacy for concerns related to Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence & Stalking, Alcohol & Other Drugs, Sexual Health & Pregnancy, Eating Disturbances & Body Image, and Nutrition.”
  • All HES services are free of charge.
  • Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday 
  • Location: 1437 37th St. NW, Poulton Hall, Suite 101
  • Contact: Email the appropriate staff member to make an appointment.
  • HES is a confidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. 

LGBTQ Resource Center: 202-687-3546

  • Mission: “The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning (LGBTQ) Resource Center provides education, programming, support services, and voice to Georgetown students, faculty, staff, and alumni of all sexual orientations and gender identities. We are committed to understanding sexual orientation and gender identity in the context of and as it intersects with race, religion, ethnicity, nationality, ability, socio-economic status, and culture.”
  • Location: 325 Leavey Center
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • The LGBTQ Resource Center is a semiconfidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. 

Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity & Affirmative Action (IDEAA): 202-687-4798

  • Mission: “The mission of the Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity & Affirmative Action is to promote a deep understanding and appreciation among the diverse members of the University community to result in justice and equality in educational, employment and contracting opportunities, as well as to lead efforts to create an inclusive academic and work environment.” 
  • Houses programs like Title IX. 
  • You can file a bias complaint on IDEAA’s website.

Online Sexual Misconduct Resource Center 

  • Mission: The online sexual misconduct center provides information about how to get help, how to help a friend, and how to better understand Georgetown’s sexual misconduct policy terms and definitions and the processes of reporting sexual misconduct.

Project Lighthouse 

  • Mission: Project Lighthouse GU is a peer-to-peer support service that allows Hoyas to anonymously voice their concerns to a sympathetic ear over a confidential online chatbox.
  • Hours: Available 7 p.m. to 1 a.m., nightly.
  • Contact: [email protected]

Residential Ministry: 202-687-4300

  • Mission: “Residential Ministers live in university residence halls and apartments to accompany and support students of all identities.”
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • Location: Residential ministers live in each dorm.
  • Campus Ministry staff are a semiconfidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. Ordained clergy acting in their pastoral roles are a confidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. 

Resources for Undergraduate Students lists resources for reporting sexual misconduct, including confidential counselors and semiconfidential and nonconfidential resources.

SafeRides: 202-784-7433

  • Mission: SafeRides provides safe transportation to and from campus and adjacent neighborhoods within defined boundaries for Georgetown students, faculty and staff who need transportation at night.
  • Hours: SafeRides service begins every evening at 8 p.m. The service is available until 2 a.m. Sunday through Wednesday and until 3 a.m. Thursday through Saturday.

Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence & Stalking Services 

  • Mission: “The Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Team has several clinicians whose area of expertise is working with and assisting survivors of interpersonal violence, including sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking. Services include resources for education, support, medical care and legal action.”
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • Jen Luettel Schweer is the associate director of Health Education Services and a confidential clinician with the Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Team who can provide confidential assistance to survivors. She can be reached at 202-687-0323 and [email protected]

Student Health Center: 202-687-2200 

  • Mission: “The Student Health Center (SHC) is staffed by primary care physicians and nurse practitioners with particular interest and experience in college health. We are dedicated to providing high quality health care to the students of Georgetown University.”
  • Fall Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday
  • Location: 3800 Reservoir Road, NW, Ground Floor, Darnall Hall
  • Contact: 
    • After-hours emergencies: 202-444-7243 — indicate that you are a student and ask for the Student Health Center physician on call.
  • The Student Health Center is a confidential resource for survivors of sexual assault.

Women’s Center: 202-687-6359

  • Mission: “The Women’s Center supports and empowers students at Georgetown. Women are the majority of the student body, yet are often marginalized in the classroom and campus experiences. As a result, the Women’s Center seeks to center the experience of women and educate the entire campus about gender dynamics that impact campus culture. We seek to create a more equitable campus for a more expansive notion of gender and gender roles. We serve students of all gender identities.”
  • Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday
  • Location: 327 Leavey Center 
  • Contact: [email protected]wn.edu
  • Virtual services offered; see the Virtual Women’s Center for more details
  • The Women’s Center is a semiconfidential resource for survivors of sexual assault. 
Categories
New Student Guide 2021

Advice to Your First-Year Self

Grace Buono

Categories
New Student Guide 2021

Georgetown Fall Athletics Rundown

Eli Kales, Caden Koontz, Carrie McDonald, Austin Barish and Demi Pappas

Georgetown students live and breathe college sports. Being knowledgeable about life on campus includes keeping up with the latest news and status of all Hoya teams. Below is some brief information to get you started on what you need to know about a few of Georgetown’s athletic programs this upcoming school year. For details on other fall sports, check out our coverage this fall!

Football

Georgetown football is back for the 2021 season, following a year in which the Hoyas’ season was canceled because of the Patriot League’s decision to nix athletic competition last fall. This year, Georgetown will be looking to come back from its hiatus on a strong note. Forty-seven players on the Hoyas’ 2021 roster are listed as first-years or sophomores and therefore will earn the chance to prove themselves with two years of fresh talent playing for the first time in NCAA competition. Senior linebacker Palmer Nix was named to the 2021 Patriot League Football Preseason All-League Team, a distinct honor as Nix hopes to lead the Hoyas to victory in his senior season. Georgetown was predicted to finish sixth in the Patriot League Preseason Poll, as voted on by Patriot League head coaches and sports information directors. The Hoyas’ season begins at home, on a recently renovated Cooper Field, against Marist on Sept. 4. Be sure to cheer on your Hoyas!

Men’s Soccer

Georgetown is a soccer school and Head Coach Brian Wiese is a campus legend. He led the men’s soccer team to its first national championship in 2019, and Georgetown students rejoiced in every building on campus. Throw in four Big East tournament championships in six years and a long series of alumni playing professional soccer and you have a storied, elite, top-tier program. The Hoyas are perennial title contenders, and names like Ifunanyachi Achara, Dylan Nealis, Derek Dodson, Rio Hope-Gund and Jacob Montes are synonymous with greatness around the Hilltop. Montes managed to sign a professional contract with Crystal Palace in England’s Premier League this year, while the other five were drafted into Major League Soccer. Head up to Shaw Field behind Yates Fieldhouse to see the Hoyas in action. Georgetown’s season begins Aug. 26 against UC Irvine.

Women’s Soccer

Ranked eleventh in the United States Coaches Preseason Poll, Georgetown women’s soccer is a force to be reckoned with as the team looks to build upon a successful 2020 campaign. Although Georgetown’s star forward and Big East Offensive Player of the Year, Jenna Menta, graduated in May, the team is still stacked with talent and an exciting level of depth. Players to watch this season include Olympian, Big East Midfielder of the Year and graduate student Daisy Cleverley and Big East Defensive Player of the Year and graduate student Kelly Ann Livingstone, as well as junior forward Gia Vicari, who was voted onto the All-Big East team last season. The Hoyas will aim for a dominant performance in the Big East, having won four out of the last five tournament championships, including 2020. Georgetown will also look to advance further in the NCAA tournament after suffering its only defeat of the 2020 season on penalties against Texas Christian University in the Round of 16. Overall, the team is hungry for more success and has the talent to back up its ambitions. Be sure to check out the Hoyas at Shaw Field this fall, beginning with a game against NC State on Thursday.

Men’s Basketball

The 2020-21 men’s basketball team was picked to finish last in the Big East Coaches’ Preseason Poll. The Hoyas shattered expectations by winning the Big East Tournament and advancing to March Madness. The championship was the Hoyas’ eighth, the most conference tournament titles in Big East history, and the first under Head Coach Patrick Ewing (CAS ’85). As a player, Ewing led Georgetown to three national championship games and its only national championship in 1984, cementing himself as one of the greatest players in college basketball history. Entering his fifth season as head coach, Ewing will look to build on last year’s success behind Big East Tournament MVP, sophomore guard Dante Harris. Ewing has also brought in one of the best recruiting classes in the country, including the son of Hoya legend and Hall of Famer Dikembe Mutombo (SLL ’91), Ryan Mutumbo. The season kicks off Nov. 13 at Capital One Arena, where the Hoyas play all of their home games. At the heart of Georgetown basketball is the late John Thompson Jr. Thompson coached the Hoyas from 1972 to 1999 and transformed it into the storied program it is today. Thompson’s impact on his players and the game of basketball cannot be understated; may his memory live forever.

Women’s Basketball

In the 2021 Big East Conference standings, Georgetown women’s basketball finished in eleventh place, with an overall record of 2-15. But don’t let these statistics fool you: The Big East is arguably the most competitive conference in NCAA women’s basketball, dominated by powerhouses UConn and Marquette. The Hoyas’ season was a captivating one, and the team played every game with a whole lot of heart. This upcoming season, expect to see the team rise in the rankings. The squad is led by returning senior forward Jillian Archer and junior forward Graceann Bennet. Players to watch include sophomore guard Kelsey Ransom, who started all 17 games as a freshman and led the season’s scoring last year, and guard Milan Bolden-Morris, a graduate student who averaged 32.1 points per game.

Categories
New Student Guide 2021

On-Campus Study Spots

Mason Leath

With the return of students to campus this fall, Georgetown University will once again fill with undergraduates toiling late into the night reading, writing and studying. However, with half of the student body being new to campus, navigating study spots is going to be a challenge for many. Luckily, we have compiled a guide to the most popular study spots on campus, so new students can find the perfect place to hammer out a growing to-do list.

Leavey Center

This student center is not only a great study spot but also houses many important spaces, including the campus bookstore, a bevy of student clubs and the Cawley Career Education Center. At the heart of it all lies Sellinger Lounge, an open room on the first floor composed of many comfortable tables and seating arrangements. Studying in Leavey also has the added benefit of many lesser-known, hidden gem study spaces. These include the Leavey esplanade, tables in the hallway next to Royal Jacket and Starbucks and even the light-filled area on the upper floor of the bookstore, by Uncommon Grounds.

Lauinger Library

As the main library on campus, Lau is obviously the quintessential Georgetown study space. Lau has six different levels and everything a student could need for a productive night of work. The second floor has a collaborative atmosphere and houses The Midnight MUG, the ideal place to grab a cup of coffee for the latest of late nights. The third floor is split in half; the left side is a “talking side,” while the Pierce Reading Room on the right side is a quiet study space. “Lau 4” is the most quiet study space on campus, and the fifth floor is where students can access the Booth Family Center for Special Collections (and an amazing view). In addition, Lau houses the Maker Hub on its ground floor for anyone needing to rent technological equipment or use a 3D printer. However, be warned that Lau’s brutalist architectural style and drab interior may leave the impression of being on set of “Stranger Things.” 

Hariri Building

Arguably one of the nicest and most modern buildings on the Georgetown campus, Hariri is chock full of great study spaces for all students, not just those in the McDonough School of Business. From the comfortable booths on the bottom floor to the penthouse colloquium room at the top, the building has incredible study areas at every level. Its authentic stone exterior complements the traditional style of Georgetown, while its eastern glass facade adds a touch of tasteful modernism to campus. Additionally, students can reserve private rooms for meetings and studying in Hariri through Georgetown’s room request system. 

Healey Family Student Center

Georgetown’s main student center was completed in 2014, and it remains one of the best study spots on campus because of its cozy, modern vibe and amenities. When the space was being constructed, the university solicited student input for its design, and the most requested service from the student body was, unsurprisingly, outlets. Now, the HFSC is littered with outlets every three feet, making it an ideal place to camp out with a computer. The HFSC is also noteworthy for its central fireplace, live plant wall and view of the Potomac. The building includes multiple dance studios, Hilltoss and Bulldog Tavern. 

Bioethics Research Library
Last but certainly not least, if you want to feel like a student at Hogwarts as you study, definitely check out the Bioethics Library on the ground floor of Healy Hall. This quiet study space is small yet grand, with large windows and long wooden tables that evoke a traditional library feel. Although the hours for the library are much more limited than other study spaces on campus, reading and studying here is like being transported to a different place and time, so it is the perfect spot to really focus.